Monthly Archives: October 2003

MAMBO ITALIANO

Reviewed by GREG KING My big fat Italian outing? Comparisons with the recent My Big Fat Greek Wedding will be inevitable, but thankfully this charming little comedy from Canada is entertaining enough to stand on its own merits. Mambo Italiano is a semi-autobiographical tale of what it was like growing up gay in a tight [...]

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PERFECT STRANGERS

Reviewed by GREG KING Director: Gaylene Preston Stars: Sam Neill, Rachel Blake. While Australian film makers keep coming up with eminently forgettable films, awful comedies and dire dramas, the New Zealand film industry seems to be producing some of the more interesting and challenging movies. A dark, macabre and enigmatic romantic drama about obsession, passion [...]

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RAISING VICTOR VARGAS

Reviewed by GREG KING Raising Victor Vargas is easily one of the best coming of age stories about the awkward pains of first love and growing up to hit screens of recent years. It lacks the phoniness and slickness of so many similar tales from Hollywood, and audiences will connect with the believable characters and [...]

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GETTIN’ SQUARE

Reviewed by GREG KING (Mushroom Pictures/Universal/Nine/Hoyts Distribution) Director: Jonathan Teplitzky Stars: Sam Worthington, David Wenham, Freya Stafford, Gary Sweet, Timothy Spall, David Field, Luke Pegler, Richard Carter, Joe Bugner, Mitchell Butel, Gary Waddell, John Brumpton, David Roberts, Ugly Dave Gray, Steven Tandy, Jonathan Biggins Running time: 100 minutes. After eight years in prison, Wattsy Wirth [...]

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MATCHSTICK MEN

Reviewed by GREG KING (New Line Cinema/Village Roadshow) Director: Ridley Scott Stars: Nicolas Cage, Sam Rockwell, Alison Lohman, Bruce McGill, Bruce Altman Running time: 116 minutes. Cinema audiences have always been fascinated with the exploits of con artists, and the genre has provided us with a number of classic films, like The Sting, etc. Although [...]

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BROKEN WINGS

Reviewed by GREG KING. This powerful and moving Israeli film explores universal themes of grief, loss, and dysfunctional families in crisis with enormous sense of sympathy, compassion and even a grim sense of humour, and could be set anywhere. Nine months after the death of their father, the Ulman family is still having trouble coping. [...]

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