Monthly Archives: July 2005

MELBOURNE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 2005

by GREG KING. MYSTERIOUS  SKIN. Gregg Araki is a controversial director who has shocked and disturbed audiences with his deliberately provocative and unsettling in-your-face-depictions of teenage sexuality, identity crises and an invulnerable younger generation on a headlong rush into self-destruction in middle America. Mysterious Skin, a provocative story about lost innocence, is his tamest effort [...]

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CODE 46

Reviewed by GREG KING. Michael Winterbottom is fast becoming the most boring filmmaker on the plant! His recent largely experimental Nine Songs attracted controversy for all the wrong reasons, as it was little more than some art house sex intermixed with some crappy concert footage. The latest Winterbottom film to hit our screens actually predates [...]

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MONSTER-IN-LAW

Reviewed by GREG KING. The embarrassing and awkward first visit to seek the approval from future in-laws has proven a gold mine for film makers recently, with the hilarious Meet The Parents and its equally funny sequel Meet The Fockers, and even the dire Guess Who?, the loose remake of the classic Guess Who’s Coming [...]

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OYSTER FARMER

Reviewed by GREG KING. Set against the rather unusual background of the isolated community of oyster farmers on the picturesque Hawkesbury River, this British-Australian co-production is a gentle and sometimes amusing tale of love, pain, redemption and second chances. Primarily a fish-out-of-water story, Oyster Farmer rarely follows a predictable path and avoids the usual cliches. [...]

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THE LONGEST YARD

Reviewed by GREG KING. Recently Adam Sandler has been trying to shake off his lovable goofball screen persona and extend his range with films like Punch Drunk Love and Spanglish. His latest attempt to further his range is something of a vanity project. Sandler takes the leading role in this remake of the classic 1974 [...]

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THE ASSASSINATION OF RICHARD NIXON

Reviewed by GREG KING. With its themes of paranoia, failure, and the souring of the American Dream, The Assassination Of Richard Nixon fits comfortably into the milieu of ‘70’s cinema that produced such powerful and searing films as Taxi Driver (with which this film eerily and uncomfortably shares some parallels), The Conversation, etc. But its [...]

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