Monthly Archives: July 2006

ROCK SCHOOL

Reviewed by GREG KING. Forget Richard Linklater’s winning comedy School Of Rock – this music school of wannabe rock stars is the real deal! Rock School is a brisk and fascinating documentary detailing the efforts of Philadelphia musician Paul Green to teach a number of aspiring rock musicians some of the basics. He teaches his [...]

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THE BEAT MY HEART SKIPPED

Reviewed by GREG KING. This somewhat awkwardly titled French remake of James Toback’s obscure 1977 cult classic Fingers actually works very well, and will especially appeal to audiences unfamiliar with the source material. The original Fingers was a dark and compelling tale, with a heady mix of sex and violence, that came across like a [...]

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HOOT

Reviewed by GREG KING. Florida-based author Carl Hiaasen writes crime novels with a comic bent – the dire Demi Moore film Striptease was based on one of his novels. Hiaasen is renowned for killing off his characters in spectacular fashion, which makes Hoot, a kiddie friendly story written specifically for younger adults, something of a [...]

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NACHO LIBRE

Reviewed by GREG KING. Nacho Libre is the second feature from Jared Hess, who gave us the cult favourite Napoleon Dynamite. It stars Jack Black, whose normally larger than life, over the top persona and energetic performances have enlivened many recent comedies, especially School Of Rock, etc, which was tailor made for him by writer [...]

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C.R.A.Z.Y.

Reviewed by GREG KING This wonderfully touching and entertaining coming-of-age and coming-out film, set against the background of Quebec in the 1960’s and ‘70’s, seems to be rich in painfully personal experiences, which resonate strongly with the audience. Born on Christmas Day 1960, Zac Beaulieu (played by newcomer Marc-Andre Grondin) is the fourth of five [...]

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UNFOLDING FLORENCE

Reviewed by GREG KING. This documentary offers a revealing portrait of Florence Broadhurst, an acclaimed designer whose patterned prints were widely used on wallpaper, who was brutally murdered in 1977. That crime has remained unsolved. In this documentary, Gillian Armstrong is less concerned with the details of the crime than in teasing out a revealing [...]

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THANK YOU FOR SMOKING

Reviewed by GREG KING. A wonderfully entertaining, razor sharp, politically astute, bitingly savage and smartly written satire that cynically explores the world of spin doctors, lobbyists and politics, Thank You For Smoking is the kind of film that Hollywood does not make enough of! Irony is not something that the Americans do very well; however [...]

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BREAKFAST ON PLUTO

Reviewed by GREG KING. Irish director Neil Jordan’s films tend to reflect those very same forces that shaped his own childhood – Catholicism, music, movies, and the turbulent political struggles of his native country. These themes have shaped many of his best films, from his 1982 debut Angel, through to the impassioned Michael Collins and [...]

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